Communication

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Table of Contents
Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………2 Oral Communication5
Written Communication5
Role of Business Communication6
Business Innovation7
Shaping Company Morale7
Sales And Marketing7
Communications Audit7
Internal and External Communication8
Communication process9
Importance of Communication11
Upward Communication13
Downward Communication15
One-Way Communication16
Two-Way Communication17
How to Conduct a Meeting?18
Corporate Meeting19
Guidelines for Effective Communication20
Tips for Professionals to Improve Communication22
Job Interview Tips24
Tips for the Interviewee25
Tips for the Interviewer25
Business Negotiations26

Introduction

There are two principal communications service markets in the Maldives, one providing voice telephony services and one providing Internet access. A total of three service providers operate within these two markets – Dhiraagu (Dhivehi Rajjeyge Gulhum), Wataniya and Focus Infocom. But each market is in practice a duopoly, with Dhiraagu and Wataniya providing telephony services, and Dhiraagu and Focus Infocom offering Internet services. These two markets overlap with one another, and intersect with the physical layer described earlier in this report. Dhiraagu had a monopoly in the ISP market until 2003, when most Internet access was still being provided through dial-up connections. Focus Infocom was selected as the second ISP licensee through a competitive process and began to offer broadband service in January 2004. Its capacity to compete with Dhiraagu was greatly improved when it obtained international fiber connectivity. CAM estimates the current total Internet market at around 30% of the population. Dhiraagu had a monopoly in the mobile phone sector until 2005, when Wataniya was selected as the second licensee, also through a competitive process. Dhiraagu reduced tariffs significantly in the run-up to liberalization, suggesting that its tariff structure before then was overpriced. Mobile phone penetration in the Maldives is high, with approximately 150 phones per 100 people. Until the end of 2008, Dhiraagu retained a monopoly on fixed telephony, and on local termination of international traffic. These exclusivities were removed when Dhiraagu license was renewed (for a fifteen year period) in January 2009, and competition was introduced into the inbound international market.

* Dhiraagu, established in 1988, is the historic incumbent fixed line operator in the Maldives and is currently the only “total solutions provider” (i.e. the only company with both telephony and ISP licenses). It is owned jointly by the government of the Maldives and the international telecoms business Cable & Wireless (C&W). The latter has joint ownership with national governments of former incumbent Telco’s in many small island Commonwealth countries. Until recently, the government owned a majority 55% share of Dhiraagu, but in the autumn of 2009 it sold 7% to C&W, giving the latter a majority shareholding (52% against 48%). Until this transfer of ownership, a majority of the board members, including the chair, were appointed by the government, although this is likely to change now. Dhiraagu personnel indicated to the mission that the government intends to sell a further 20-30% of its remaining shares (i.e. 10-15% of the company) through an initial public offering (IPO) in the near future, but this has not been confirmed by government officials. Operational management of Dhiraagu has been and remains with C&W but, at the national level, Dhiraagu is managed by Maldivians. These managers, who are well-trained and professional, made it clear that only the company business plan and major procurement decisions require approval by C&W headquarters in London. At the same time, the company benefits from sharing experience with other C&W operations and from access to C&W training...
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